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Android Filesystem HARDWARE SMARTPHONES TUTORIALS

What Is Jmtpfs In Linux & How To Use It? Explained

Jmtpfs is a combination of FUSE (Userspace Filesystem) and MTP (Media Transfer Protocol) stack integrated together to form a filesystem tool. The jmtpfs tool is then used to mount your smartphones or other handheld devices onto your Linux computer so that you can browse the content of your smartphone or handheld device directly from your computer.

Jmtpfs filesystem stack in a Linux computer

What Is A FUSE Filesystem?

FUSE filesystem stands for Userspace Filesystem. In general cases, when you need to create your own filesystems, you need to have knowledge of the Operating System (OS) kernel and block storage device drivers. This would restrict the development of new filesystems to only kernel developers.

In Linux, in order to overcome this, a new type of filesystem model was introduced called the FUSE file system. In a FUSE filesystem, you will make use of a pre-written generic FUSE Linux kernel module, which you as a userspace developer need not have to modify. In addition to this, you will also make use of a pre-written FUSE userspace library that would provide the required API interfaces to the FUSE kernel modules form the userspace.

Using these two modules, it is now possible for the userspace developers to write their own filesystems by inserting the FUSE kernel module into their machine’s operating system and then writing their own filesystem with the help of FUSE library modules.

Such developed FUSE filesystems will place the files and directories exposed by the filesystem in the userspace region of the OS which is accessible by even non privileged users.

What Is Media Transfer Protocol (MTP)?

Media Transfer Protocol (MTP) is a type of protocol used to transfer media files such as audio files, videos files or image files at the file level rather than at the storage level. This protocol became a USB standard to transfer media files between a computer and a USB device.

The main reason why we would use an MTP protocol instead of the USB standard Mass Storage protocol is that when you use a Media Transfer Protocol (MTP) to transfer file, the whole file is transferred from the device to the computer or vice versa. So, the entire transfer of file happens as a single unit, hence transactional. In this way, both the device and host can continue to access the same file simultaneously, which is not possible when using a USB Mass Storage Device Class (MSC) protocol.

In case of an USB MSC protocol, when a USB mass storage device such as a music player is mounted on to a computer, the music player loses control over the files which is stored within itself and is taken over by the host computer’s filesystem. In this situation, the host computer can modify the content of the files and the USB device has no way to prevent it. This may lead to host computer corrupting the files of the USB mass storage device! But this situation is not at all possible when we use an MTP protocol due to its transactional file transfer nature. Hence MTP protocol is preferred over a USB MSC protocol.

JMPTFS tool makes use of both FUSE filesystem and the USB MTP protocol to mount the content of your smartphone onto a local directory on your computer, thereby giving access to the file contents of your smartphone even when you are a non privileged user.

How To Use Jmtpfs tool To Transfer Files From Your Smartphone

In order to use jmtpfs, you first need to create a local directory such as ‘myPhone’ in your computer. Next, you connect your Android or any other smartphone to your computer using an USB cable. Then by issuing the console command ‘jmtpfs myPhone’ you can mount the content of your smartphone onto your mount directory ‘myPhone’. In other words, after issuing the command, you will be able to browse the content of your smartphone within the mount directory ‘myPhone’ just like any other files and folders of your computer.

> mkdir ~/myPhone
> jmtpfs ~/myPhone
> ls myPhone
  Internal storage/

At the end, in order to unmount your smartphone filesystem from your computer, you need to issue another command:

> fusermount -u ~/myPhone

This should unmount your smartphone’s filesystem safely without corrupting any part of the filesystem on your smartphone.

Categories
Android SMARTPHONES TUTORIALS

Motorola One Macro Launched, Priced At Rs.9999

Motorola has officially launched its next Android smartphone in its Motorola One series called the Motorola One Macro. Motorola One Macro is priced at Rs.9999 and will be available for purchase from its official online partner Flipkart website and app from October 12, 2019.

Motorola One Macro

Motorola One Macro is yet another Android smartphone from Motorola focusing primarily on its camera functionality just like its predecessors Motorola One Action & Motorola One Vision.

Motorola One Macro specializes and differentiates itself from other smartphones by utilizing a seperate Macro camera sensor that helps in capturing natural photos at close ups to reveal hidden details that are not normally captured by other camera sensors.

Motorola One Macro also comes with a 6.2 inches Max Vision display, 4 GB RAM, 64 GB Built In Internal Storage with memory card support that can expand the internal storage by adding SD Card support of upto 512 GB.

Motorola One Macro is powered by a Octa Core Mediatek Helio P70 microprocessor which is fabricated using 12 nm technology. On the GPU front, Motorola One Macro is GPU powered by 900MHz Mali GPU designed by ARM.

Motorola One Macro also supports Hybrid nano Dual SIMs where one of the SIM slot will be shared with a micro SD Card, so you will only be able to use SIM or a micro SD Card in that hybrid SIM/SD Card slot.

On the Operating System (OS) front, Motorola One Macro runs on Android 9 Pie, however despite its name and being in the Motorola One series where other smartphones ran on Android One OS, this Motorola One Macro does not run on an Android One.

Speaking of the camera, Motorola One Macro boasts a 13 MP rear camera with f/2.0 aperture and LED Flash support, a 2 MP Macro camera sensor and another 2 MP depth sensor for portrait captures. The front selfie camera boasts a 8 MP sensor with f/2.2 aperture at 1.12μm pixel size.

In addition to this, the Motorola One Macro comes with various standard sensors such as accelerometer, gyroscope, proximity sensor along with finger print sensor which is becoming quite common these days.

On the Audio front, Motorola One Macro provides support for 3.5mm audio jack, mono speaker with dolby surround sound and adds support for FM Radio.

Talking about the battery, Motorola One Macro comes with a 4000 mAh battery, which when compared with the previous launch of Motorola One Action which supported only 3500 mAh battery, is much better here. The charging rate is still at 10W.

The Motorola One Macro is not exactly water resitant, but with its IPX2 rating, this Android smartphone is for sure splash resistant like its predecessors.

On the wireless side, Motorola One Macro supports the standard Dual 4G VoLTE, WiFi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.2, GPS, GLONASS and comes with support of USB Type-C connector.

All in all, the Motorola One Macro Android smartphone sure looks like a smartphone that is quite good for its price tag of just Rs.9,999 and if you are a photo enthusiast and particularly into Macro photography, then Motorola One Macro Android smartphone is something that you would love to keep in your pocket for those sudden opportunities that arises where you can go for Macro photography without having to run around to fetch your dedicated macro photography camera.